Most New Cases Since June 2

ILLINOIS — State health officials on Wednesday announced 1,598 new cases of the coronavirus and 23 additional deaths from COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the virus. That brings the statewide total to 165,301 confirmed infections and 7,347 known deaths. Another 1,175 probable cases and 193 probable deaths are not included in the official totals.

The latest deaths include:

  • Cook County: 1 male 40s, 1 female 50s, 1 male 50s, 3 females 60s, 1 male 60s, 1 female 70s, 1 male 70s, 2 females 80s, 1 female 90s

  • DeKalb County: 1 female 90s

  • DuPage County: 1 female 50s

  • Kane County: 1 female 70s, 1 female 90s

  • Knox County: 1 female 70s

  • Lake County: 1 female 70s

  • McHenry County: 1 male 50s

  • Montgomery County: 1 female 100+

  • St. Clair County: 1 female 70s

  • Winnebago County: 1 female 70s, 1 female 90s

“We’ve seen real progress over these last four and a half months, but our numbers now appear to be gradually rising, and that’s very concerning,” Gov. J.B. Pritzker said at a news conference on Wednesday.

NBC Chicago reported Tuesday that of the five states to first see major coronavirus outbreaks — Illinois, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Michigan — Illinois leads the pack in new cases. This week, the state saw its highest five-day average of new cases since early June.

State health officials say they are monitoring indicators across the 11 emergency management regions announced last week to detect “early but significant” increases in the spread of the virus that might signal a coming surge of cases.

Officials said if indicators show an increase in COVID-19 cases with a simultaneous decrease in hospital capacity, or if there are three consecutive days with more than an 8 percent positive test rate, a region may need new restrictions to head off the virus.

Officials said Wednesday that at least one Illinois region is “dangerously close” to such restrictions. See how your region is doing here.

Possible measures are detailed in a planning document published online last week:

For example, restaurants may have to reduce indoor capacity or suspend bar service; hospitals may have to cancel elective surgeries and limit visitation; and stores and offices may have to limit capacity. If things get worse, bars and restaurants may have to suspend in-person dining altogether, or nonessential businesses may have to close again.

In the past 24 hours, labs in Illinois have processed 39,633 coronavirus tests, for a total of more than 2.3 million since the pandemic began. The state’s rolling, seven-day positivity rate is about 3.2 percent, up more than half a percentage point from its low last month.

According to Johns Hopkins University, a positivity rate of less than 5 percent is a good measure of whether enough tests are being conducted in a given state.

As of Tuesday, the United States as a whole had tested more than 47.2 million people for the coronavirus. The country now has more than 3.9 million confirmed coronavirus infections, and, according to Johns Hopkins University, at least 142,595 Americans have died from COVID-19.

Based on the latest predictions by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 150,000 to 170,000 Americans could be dead from the disease by Aug. 1.

Globally, more than 15 million people have been infected and 618,994 are known to have died.

Illinois Coronavirus Helpline:

Illinois officials say a state helpline has been set up to provide emotional support and quick answers to questions about the coronavirus pandemic. Illinoisans can test “TALK” to 55-2020 (or “HABLAR” for Spanish), and within 24 hours they will receive a call from a counselor. Residents can also text keywords such aS “UNEMPLOYMENT,” “FOOD” or “SHELTER,” to the same number to receive additional information about those topics.

Here’s what’s happening with the coronavirus in Illinois:

1 IL Coronavirus Region ‘Dangerously Close’ To New Restrictions

The state could soon step in after an uptick in cases in the Metro East emergency management region, Gov. J. B. Pritzker said Wednesday.

Travel Restrictions On Wisconsin Visitors ‘As Soon As Next Week’

Cases are surging in Wisconsin, and city officials say people there aren’t wearing masks at the level they are in Chicago.

Pritzker Extends Illinois’ Eviction Hold For Another Month

The state’s moratorium on evictions now runs through Aug. 22.

Ban On Indoor Service At Bars, Taverns, Breweries To Start Friday

As coronavirus cases spike, Chicago officials announce restrictions on bars, indoor fitness classes and personal services will start Friday.

Illinois Teachers Union Says School Year Should Start Online

Returning to in-person instruction without sufficient coronavirus safety measures is too risky, the union says.

Edward Hospital Sees Uptick In Coronavirus Inpatients

At the time of publication, the Naperville hospital was treating 11 patients with the new coronavirus.

Metra Lets Medical Personnel Ride Free Through August

August will mark the fifth consecutive month that Metra will allow frontline medical workers to skip the fare, officials said.

Face Masks In Schools: Pritzker Lawsuit Seeks Order

The lawsuit was filed Thursday against three schools that recently announced their refusal to comply with health and safety guidelines.

Cemeno’s Pizza: Employee Coronavirus Case Confirmed

Cemeno’s informed its Facebook followers that it hopes to reopen within a few days.

Gymnastics Center Closing In Buffalo Grove

The owners of the Buffalo Grove Gymnastics Center made the announcement via social media, blaming COVID-19 for the decision.

COVID-19 Quarantine Requirements: Suburban Cook County Sets Rules

Suburban Cook County joins Chicago in requiring visitors from states with high incidence of COVID-19 infections to quarantine for 14 days.

Coronavirus Cases Reported At Deerfield School Camp

The Deerfield Park District announced Friday night the children were campers at Wilmot Elementary School.

Free Headshots: Glenview Photographer To Help Unemployed

Sari Pina, of Sari P. Photography, is participating in a national single-day photo initiative amid the coronavirus pandemic.

48% Will Not Eat Out, 78% Uncomfortable With Indoor Entertainment

A Plainfield reader who responded to a recent poll said the “governor has rushed us into Phase 4, putting the economy over lives.”

Boy, 7, Fighting For Life Against Coronavirus-Linked Infection

Brandon Vargas has suffered major organ damage after contracting multisystem inflammatory syndrome, Mayor Richard Irvin said.

Coronavirus by the numbers:

Illinois:

  • Total number of coronavirus cases: 165,301

  • Deaths: 7,347

  • People tested: 2,348,487

  • Recovered: Illinois does not provide exact numbers of recovered cases, but says the recovery rate is 95 percent.

Nationwide:

  • Total number of coronavirus cases: 3,935,211

  • Deaths: 142,595

  • People tested: 47,224,382

  • Recovered: 1,182,018

Global:

  • Total number of coronavirus cases: 15,033,861

  • Deaths: 618,994

  • People tested: No data available

  • Recovered: 8,536,350

Sources: Johns Hopkins University and IDPH

Tips from the CDC on dealing with coronavirus:

While the best way to prevent illness is to avoid virus exposure, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention generally recommends taking these actions to prevent the spread of viruses:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

  • Stay home when you are sick.

  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.

What to do if you’re sick:

Call head if you’re planning to visit your doctor:

  • If you have a medical appointment, call the health care provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the health care provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.

Stay home unless you must see a doctor:

  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.

  • Avoid public areas: Do not go to work, school, or public areas.

  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home:

  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.

  • Limit contact with pets and animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just as you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus.

  • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a face mask. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.

Avoid sharing personal household items:

  • Do not share: You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home.

  • Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.

Masks:

  • CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission. CDC also advises the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

  • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

  • The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators. Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

  • Face mask instructions — sew- and no-sew masks

To donate personal protective equipment (PPE), email PPE.donations@illinois.gov. For health questions about COVID-19, call the state coronavirus hotline at 800-889-3931 or email dph.sick@illinois.gov.

This article originally appeared on the Across Illinois Patch

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